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English Communication Skills: Time of Day Tips for Presentations – Afternoon and Evening Presentations

English Communication Skills:  Time of Day Tips for Presentations – Afternoon and Evening Presentations

shutterstock_120239734Knowing the barriers associated with different times of the day can help you think of clever ways to maximize your impact in a presentation. Nice! What you are learning for presentations is, of course, also true with meetings.  Use the same clever solutions!

Afternoon             

  • Listeners will need a coffee break.  Do make coffee available—or risk the likelihood that they’ll interrupt your message to seek out coffee and miss a chunk of what you have to say.
  • People may be overwhelmed with data.  Rather than hit them with lots of hard data up front, consider a low-key opening so they can ease into your message. Also, provide lots of handouts so they can review details later.
  • Attendees may need to leave early to start the commute home.  Nothing is worse for listeners than you running overtime at the end of the day.  People want to head home–make that happen as promised.

Early evening

  • Attendees may arrive late (and tired) from working all day.  Respect their situations.
  • Parents with young children may need to go home early to put their children to bed.  Have a table at the back of the room so early departures can take the promotional material or info sheets without distracting the rest of the audience.

After-dinner speech

  • Audiences may have been drinking alcohol at a cocktail or beer and/or wine reception.  Be prepared for loud chatter.
  • People may simply want to socialize- and may resent a serious speech (especially one that runs too long).  Engage them with your topic, your enthusiasm, your stories, and your brevity!

Click here: www.cleartalkmastery.com/scheduler to sign up for a Free Sample Lesson with us!

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos  for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercises.

 

 

Rerun from July 16, 2014

Practice Makes Perfect

Practice Makes Perfect

Rehearse out loud. The only way you can tell how your speech will sound is to do it and listen to it. That means you have to say it out loud. Doing the speech in your head and listening to it doesn’t work – that is not the voice your audience will hear.

 

 

 

Rerun from 07/30/2014

English Communication Skills: Time of day tips for presentations–Lunch

English Communication Skills: Time of day tips for presentations–Lunch

shutterstock_136833263As human beings, we like to combine business with pleasure.  Thus, presenters are asked to do the noon meal.  Here are some tips for you so that this occasion for presentation can indeed combine work with pleasure.

Presentations during lunch:

  • Lunch presents problems for listeners, who, of course, want to eat.  Never talk when your listeners are trying to enjoy the main part of their meal.  If you must talk during dessert, that’s doable. But be prepared for the sounds of clinking forks and rattling coffee cups.
  • Lunch also presents a double problem for speakers.  Ah yes, you need food for energy.  But you can’t eat a big meal right before you speak because it will just sit there in your stomach as a big lump.  Then there is the added danger of getting food stuck in your teeth.  Distracting? Yes!  It is distracting for listeners to watch the spinach stuck between your front teeth flapping in the breeze of your “s” and “z”.  Best option?  Consider doing a light snack before you arrive.  Then skip the served meal.  Use your table time to relax and find out what other people are thinking.
  • Participants want to talk with their friends.  Do make your luncheon talk as informal and conversational as possible – so listeners feel like you’re at the table conversing with them.
  • Luncheon groups want to have fun.  Give them fun—real life examples, anecdotes, clever quotes.  Remember: Lunch is meant to be a relaxing break in their day

Presentations Immediately after lunch

  • Listeners may be drowsy after eating a big meal.  Make the opening of your speech attention-grabbing.
  • Post-lunch attendees may not be able to arrive on time.  If you don’t want your opening to be interrupted, consider starting a few minutes late.  You could even usher late arrivals into the room personally.
  • Listeners may have a difficult time switching from an “entertainment mode” to a “learning mode.”  Consider opening with something lighthearted to make that transition easier for them

Next time:  Pitfalls in afternoon and evening presentations

Click here: www.cleartalkmastery.com/scheduler to sign up for a Free Sample Lesson with us!

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos  for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercises.

 

 

Rerun from 07-09-2014

Tip: Convincing People

Tip: Convincing People

The more separate arguments you make against your opponent’s position, the more difficult it is for your opponent to deal with each of those items.

 

 

 

Rerun from June 23, 2014

English Communication Skills: Presentation Time of Day Pitfalls

English Communication Skills: Presentation Time of Day Pitfalls

What time of day will you be speaking or doing a presentation?  Will it make a difference? Absolutely.

shutterstock_189307373Here are some pitfalls.   Know these, and you can prevent problems.  For today’s blog, we will discuss pitfalls for morning presentations.

Breakfast/early morning

  • Listeners may be groggy.  Choose a stimulating issue or anecdote to open with. Get audience involvement by having them raise their hand in agreement or disagreement.
  • People may be in a rush.  So this is not the time for leisurely humor or drawn-out details.  At breakfast, more than any other time of day, it’s wise to heed the great US president Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s advice: “Be sincere, be brief, be seated.”
  • Listeners may be preoccupied with work tasks of the day.  This, of course, will affect their receptivity.  Draw them into the topic with quick anecdotes or thought provoking quotations.
  • People attending may be irritable. Why? Because they had to change their morning commute to attend the meeting.

Mid-morning

  • Listeners may need a coffee break.  If at all possible, provide coffee and tea.  Otherwise, listeners may head to the nearest cafeteria and miss a chunk of your presentation.
  • Attendees may need to use the restrooms.  A good rule of thumb: If your listeners have been sitting for more than an hour, give them a quick three-minute break before you talk.  Otherwise, they’ll just leave in the middle anyway—interrupting other people in the audience and distracting you.
  • People may need to check in to their office for messages.  Again, a three-minute break is a good remedy—it gives them a chance to make a quick call without bothering the whole room.  But don’t give them too long, or they may get bogged down with expanded work details

Immediately before lunch

  • Listeners are hungry and probably can’t concentrate well.  Don’t be surprised if no one asks any questions before lunch.  It doesn’t mean they are bored.  It only means they’d rather go eat.  Here’s a good alternative: Invite people to ask questions throughout your presentation.  Be sure to keep questions and answers in check so you don’t run over time.  Audiences are very forgiving – except for making them late for lunch.
  • Listeners have been sitting all morning and may need to stretch.  What’s an easy solution? Invite them to stand up and take a thirty-second “stretch break” right at their seats.
  • Listeners may get “information overload.”  Supplement your speaking with handouts so people can review material later.

Next time: What about lunch presentations?

Click here: www.cleartalkmastery.com/scheduler to sign up for a Free Sample Lesson with us!

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos  for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercises.

 

 

Rerun from July 2, 2014