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English Communication Skill: Asking Questions- Secrets of Open-Ended Questions

English Communication Skill: Asking Questions- Secrets of Open-Ended Questions

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Increasing your question asking skill is indeed the skill experts say will do the most for career advancement.  And increasing your skill in asking questions will make your conversations more interesting – for the other person and you!

And here is a tip for you.  When you can, ask open-ended questions.

Unlike simple yes-or-no questions, open-ended questions allow the respondent to talk – and enable you to get much more information.   Questions requiring a “yes” or “no” limit choices and force a decision.  On the other hand, when you want to find out a person’s opinion or gather some facts (especially during the course of a negotiation) the more you can get the other person to talk, the more information you learn.

Here is an example of a simple closed-ended question requiring a yes-or-no answer:

“Do you like this car?”

An open-ended question, on the other hand, encourages the person to talk:

“What do you like about this car?”

Here are some classic open-ended questions when you want to get information.  They invite the other person to open up:

“What happened next?”

“So how did that make you feel?”

“Tell me about that.”

Go to the next level in question asking. Go to open-ended questions.

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos  for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercise.

 

 

Rerun from March 25, 2015

The “Asking for Support” Call

The “Asking for Support” Call

The “Asking for Support” call is not only a request for something.  It is also your research to get information and  learn more about a specific topic.  This kind of call can provide information, a recommendation, a referral, an appointment, words of encouragement, new ideas, or new opportunities.

 

 

 

Rerun from March 23, 2015

English Communication Skill: Asking Questions- Secrets to the Two Goals of Questions

English Communication Skill: Asking Questions- Secrets to the Two Goals of Questions

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Today we get back to English communication skills.

Asking questions is at the heart of communication.   In fact, experts say that increasing skills in asking questions and voice inflection are the two skills that do the most to boost the careers of native-born speakers of English.

Yay! Asking questions builds relationship and rapport.  Asking questions enables you to get the information you need and to clarify information.  Asking questions gets involvement in communication and makes a dialogue.

Sometimes international people and native-born English speakers feel uncomfortable with asking questions. That is when it sure helps to know that the two goals of asking questions are simple: to get facts and to get opinions.

To get facts:

  1. “When did you begin work on the plan?”
  2. “How many employees are available for this task?”
  3. “What are the dimensions of the house?”
  4. “Which car reached the intersection first?”

To get opinions:

  1. “How good is this plan?”
  2. “Will the schedule work?”
  3. “What do you think of the design of the house?”
  4. “Who caused the accident?”

Add asking questions to your communication in your work or academic life and in your daily life.  The other person will love the interaction and your seeking their knowledge and opinion.  You will love the relationship building and the information that helps you move forward in your goals and tasks.

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos  for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercise.

 

 

Rerun from March 18, 2015

The “Asking for Support” Call

The “Asking for Support” Call

This call is made to ask for information, ideas, contacts, or support of some kind.  The most important thing is to be clear about what you want and how you think this person can help.

Let people know what is special about them that caused you to call.

 

 

Rerun from March 16, 2015

Who Should Do This ClearTalk Weekly Subscription Program? Accent Reduction

Who Should Do This ClearTalk Weekly Subscription Program?  Accent Reduction

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So you ask—Who should do this ClearTalk Weekly subscription program?

Put simply: We designed the weekly lessons for all people who want to reduce their accent and speak clear, easy to understand American English.

The ClearTalk Weekly subscription program is based on the Clear Talk Method – our systematic, scientifically based, experienced-based manner of efficient long-lasting learning.  That method was successful with over 2000 enrollments, with people with 64 different first languages, and with people with a wide range of accented English.

Thus we confidently designed the course with these people in mind:

  • People who have heavy accents
  • People who have moderate to light accents
  • People who have pursued other courses for English pronunciation and are wanting more improvement
  • People who have never taken a pronunciation course and want to improve their English speaking now
  • Our former students who are wanting to refine their English speaking and reach the next level of clear talk

All these different kinds of students have already greatly benefited from the Clear Talk Method of learning.

How can such a wide range of students benefit?   The answer is in the practice.  Those who want and need to practice more, can do exactly that. In this subscription, they can do unlimited guided practice with Dr. Antonia. For example, persons with a heavy accent may decide to do deliberate practice with the videos multiple times during the day and night until they have mastery.  The student decides how much practice, perfect practice with Dr. Antonia, to do.  We provide the tools and tell you how best to practice.

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercise.

 

 

Rerun from March 11, 2015