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Have You Noticed This Wisdom in North American Media Stories?

SPEECH TIP ON WEBSITE FOR  TUESDAY, SEPT. 29, 2020 

The speech tip for today, Tuesday, September 29, 2020, is a summary of wisdom prevalent in media these last several years.  Well… just a preliminary summary. Just a bit and not all. For example pieces of this wisdom you will find here—the best seller in 2019, The Boy, the mole , the fox and the Horse by Charlie Mackesy, the Disney movies such as Frozen, adult TV police type procedurals such as Blue Blood,  NCIS Los Angeles, NCIS, 2020 Last Tango in Halifax—BBC.

Many of these stories seem to say:

1) Home is not always a place.  It is who you are with.

2) You are who you are, and you are different than any other person and you are valuable.

3) You are loved.

4)  Family is not always blood relatives.  Sometimes the best of the family or the only family is friend or friends.

5)  Sometimes work colleagues are family.  Sometimes the only family.

6) You are unique.

7)  Perhaps the best thing for you to do is what you do in a unique way.

8)  Do not measure your value from how you are treated.  You may be treated badly (or treated as a king or queen and the most valuable of the world).   Your value is not measured by either end of the spectrum.

9) What should you do when you feel bad?  Sometimes sharing and communicating these sad or bad feelings helps.   Sometimes not.  Sometimes thinking of what you are grateful for helps.  Sometimes thinking of happy stuff helps.  Sometimes  not.  Sometimes the best thing to do is wait.  Sometimes that is because all things pass or change, sooner or later.  Too bad some change takes lotttts of time.  Sometimes the best thing to do is to wait.  Sometimes that is because sometimes eventually you may feel bad enough that it will suddenly (or slowly)  make it easier for you to make change.  Maybe you will wait for a day, a week, or….? Then you notice that your heart and mind has become clear and you know what is the best thing for you to do at that time.

You know this—some wisdom stays the same over years, or decades, or centuries, ages, epochs.

And sometimes wisdom or what people think is true changes. Friends as family goes wayyy back in literature and stories.  More and more over the last  thirty years… and more… for many people, their family are their friends.  Their friends are more “family” to them than  their blood relatives.  For some people. Why? Lots of reasons, it depends on the individual person.

Friends as family  showed up in  television series after series in the USA—including the terrifically popular from the 1980s and 1990s and 2000s to now (still) “The Big Bang Theory”, “Friends”,  “Golden Girls”.  Police procedurals  2000s through now.

Is this “friends as family” bad?   Good?   Ack….Relationship is relationship. Connection is connection.  Love and acceptance is love and connection.

You call this a speech tip?   I asked myself that question. Yep, before I wrote these words and now after I wrote these words, I answered, yes this is indeed a speech tip.  If it still feels right tomorrow, I will post this as this week’s speech tip.

OK. I sat on this for 18 hours. Now for the end of this speech tip.   Speech is communication.  Cultural values are communicated in the stories of the time.  Cultural values are fun to think about. And talk about.  Cheers.

Copyright 2020 Clear Talk Mastery, Inc.

Words & Phrases Especially Good Now

The speech tip for today, Monday, September 21, 2020 are examples of phrases and sentences I have heard In the last 30 days which fit these times we are living.  Individuals are adapting. Organizations are adapting. Interactions between individuals are adapting.

It’s way better to be wrong when I say I can … than to be right when I say I can’t.

We have similar goals and trust.  You should have called.”    …. And… “A team is safer.”  Response:  “I don’t have a team.” Heard  from a dialogue between two “almost”  colleagues on the American television show NCIS- Los Angeles-“

“Empathy, transparency and innovation.”  What business organizations need now, in the time of the pandemic COVID-19.  Heard  on CNBC  USA, August 2020.  CNBC is a broadcast network station devoted to all things financial.

“Spirit of the business”- Phrase also heard on CNBC.  Example for using this phrase:  “The spirit of the business is empathy, transparency and innovation to deal with these unusual times.”

“You have your interpretations”   Heard during  an interview between  a DW correspondent  from Germany and  a Chinese official.   The gentleman from China was responding to the correspondent/interviewer’s  analysis of  the acts of persons in Hong Kong and the Chinese government actions and reactions during the summer of 2020.

Copyright 2020 Clear Talk Mastery, Inc.

For those of you who want to speak more accurate English, here’s our You Tube Clear Talk Mastery Video #13 for the “zh” sound which is an “sh” with a voice.  Dr. Johnson shows you how to pronounce the accurate “zh” sound for the “s” letter. She uses the frequently used word “usually.”

Try Using These Super Current Phrases

Speech Tip for today, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020 on website www.ClearTalkMastery.com

Okayyyy.  Speech tip today is  your using words and phrases which caught my ear in the last several weeks on media.   I love these words and phrases.  For those of you trying to improve your English speech enunciation or pronunciation, each of these has at least one “L” sound.   I’ll attach  one of our YouTube  little speech videos for the “L”  sound at the bottom.

  1. “It was my privilege”    as in  “It was my privilege to attend the dinner honoring Mr. Kenneth Brandon for his work with photography.”
  2. “If you want to know more, please check out _____.”
  3. “mind control”  as in “Governments, including the USA and Russia” carried out mind control experiments in the 1950s as part of their Cold War strategy to win that “Cold War.”.
  4. “Golden Lion”   as in “The highest cinema award given at the Venice Film Festival  is called the “Golden Lion”.  It is comparable to the USA “Oscar”.
  5. “______  faced death by living life to the fullest.”
  6. “He fought multiple battles with ________.”   As in “He fought multiple battles with cancer.”
  7. “substantial proof”   as in “There is substantial proof that COVID -19 has killed far more people over 75 in the USA than under 75.

Here is English Speech Tip #35, alson on YouTube/ClearTalkMastery which is for the “L” speech sound as in “file” and “value.”

copyright 2020 Clear Talk Mastery, Inc

Talk Clearly With Face Mask

SPEECH TIP. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2020

Seven of our current student-learners are ITAs, International Teaching Assistants, for Chemistry or BioChemistry.  They want to know—how do you lecture using a facemask.

Answer- You will need to maximize using the Six Clear Talk Strategies.

In brief,   first, talk a little louder.  Your voice has to penetrate or go through a mask. Download a free app from the internet for a Sound Level Meter—digital.  Aim for decibels in the 70s.

Second-  speak each word clearly.  Each word is important

Third- Pronounce the north American quick consonants quickly (p,t, k, ch  and b, d, g, j)

Fourth -AND speak the slow consonants slowly (all the rest!).

Fifth- Pronounce the vowels very clearly.   American  English long vowels have two sounds (all except one!).  American Short Vowels have one sound,  BUT two are slowly spoken or stretched out.  Those are the American English short vowel  /a/ as in the memory word “hat”  and the American English short vowel /o/  as in the word “not”.

Fifth and most important—DO  NOT SLUR the words together.  Do not do like this “Whatchadoing. “  Instead, what are you doing.”

Remember, these strategies for American English come from 100 years of research… starting all the way back to when the telephone was first invented.

REMEMBER, people cannot see your mouth. 

Remember, some consonants are 30 to 40 dB SOFTER than the vowels.

Hope this helps.  Happy Talking.

BELOW IS Clear Talk Mastery Speech Tip # 57 for “ch” as in “chin”.  This is one of those consonants that is 30 to 40 decibels softer than vowels. Be sure to say it in the American English manner- very quick!

copyright 2020 Clear Talk Mastery, Inc

When do you emphasize the syllable with the root word?

Website Speech Tip FOR Tuesday, AUGUST 25, 2020 Do you want to understand why sometimes you are supposed to put the word syllable accent or stress on the same syllable as the root word and sometimes you  are not supposed to ?

English Pronunciation: Have you ever wondered why when you add a suffix onto a root word, sometimes the word syllable accent stress stays on the same syllable as the root word and sometimes it moves to the syllable next to the suffix ending?                  

Here’s the answer.  First, please recall that English is largely built from Germanic, French and Latin languages.

Second, the German language keeps the syllable accent stress on the same syllable as the original root word.

Here are the German based suffixes to memorize- “y,” “ly,” “ful,” “some, “ “ness,” “less”. 

Do yourself a favor, and memorize these.  Then when you see them, you will know to emphasize the “root”  word with going up in pitch on that syllable.

For more detail, click on the link to our blog of Monday, August 24, 2020 for “y,” “ly,” “ful.”  Blog link goes here.

 I will come back with more info.

Here is an important take-home message. The Germanic language was wise and clever. The “root” word of a multiple syllable word is the MOST important.  So emphasize that.  Go up in pitch on that to guide the listener.  For written language, the reader’s eye will recognize right away the “root”  or “root word” or “stem”.  The meaning of the word will leap out at the reader.   And beautifully, human beings will figure out the meaning of the suffixes.  They will intuitively and probably even consciously recognize  “y,” “ly,” “ful,” “some,” “ness,” “less”  to make the root word into another part of speech.

Video 44, January – Janus is the root, put the word syllable accent on :Jan

copyright 2020 Clear Talk Mastery, Inc