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Dr. Antonia Johnson

Best Number of Minutes for Presentations to Management

Best Number of Minutes for Presentations to Management

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Keep it short.  Ten minutes.  That means refine your presentation so it’s direct and to the point and interesting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rerun from May 30, 2016

Accent Reduction – Get the Syllable Accent Stress Rules for French-Latin Suffixes

Accent Reduction – Get the Syllable Accent Stress Rules for French-Latin Suffixes      

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I like finding the patterns in English pronunciation.  Based on academic learning and experience, I’ve learned that about everything has a pattern.

I’ve been looking for the pattern for syllable accent stress when suffixes are added to English words for quite some time.

Voila—reading John McWhorter, I found a good part of the answer.

Recall that for Germanic suffixes, the syllable accent stress stays in the same place as it was in the root word.

However, that is not the case with French and Latin suffixes.  Instead, the key is that French and Latin endings often pull the syllable accent stress closer to the suffix. In particular, the syllable accent stress moves to the syllable right before the suffixes which are French or Latin in origin.  These suffixes include –ity , –uous, -ic, -tion/sion/cian.

MO-dern

Mo-DER-ni-ty

PER-son-al

per-son-AL-ity

TEM-pest

Tem-PEST- uous

DI-plo-mat

di-plo-MA-tic

OR-gan

or-GAN-ic

CHAR-ac-ter

Char-ac-ter-IS-tic

PER-mit

per-MIS-sion

pro-HI-bit

pro-hi-BI-tion

POL-i-tics

Pol-i-TI-cian

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos  for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercise.

Check out our new advanced weekly speech tip program, our new subscription called ClearTalk Weekly, www.subscription.cleartalkmastery.com

 

 

Rerun from May 4, 2016

Dressing for Presentations

Dressing for Presentations

If your office dress is business casual, be sure you err on the side of business versus casual.  This gives the impression that you are more serious and committed to your work.

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Rerun from May 23, 2016

Accent Reduction – Finally- the Keys to Suffixes and Syllable Accent Stress (Germanic vs French-Latin suffix rules)

Accent Reduction – Finally- the Keys to Suffixes and Syllable Accent Stress (Germanic vs French-Latin suffix rules)

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Have you ever wondered why when you add a suffix onto a root word, sometimes the syllable accent stress stays on the same syllable as the root word and sometimes it moves to the syllable next to the suffix ending?

For example:

  • WON-der and WON-der-ful
  • PER-son-al and per-son-AL-ity

The answer lies in which language the suffix comes from.  Recall that English is heavily built from Germanic, French, and Latin languages.

Put simply:

  • The German language keeps the syllable accent stress on the same syllable as the original root word.
  • But French and Latin endings often pull the syllable accent stress closer to the suffix.

Today’s blog will give examples with the Germanic suffixes –y,  –ly, –ful, -ness, less, 

Next week, we will do examples with French and Latin derived suffix endings.

Remember, for Germanic suffixes, keep the syllable accent stress on the same syllable as the original or root word.

CHEER.

CHEER-y

CHEER-i-ly

WON- der

WON-der- ful.

PUR-pose

PUR-pose-ful

CON-scious

CON-scious-ness

com-PET-i-tive

com-PET-i-tive-ness

POW-er

POW-er-less

PUR-pose

PUR-pose-less

BOTH-er

BOTH-er-some

CUM-ber

CUM-ber-some

Be sure to watch our English Speech Tips videos and Accent Reduction Tip videos  for more English pronunciation and accent reduction exercise.

Check out our new advanced weekly speech tip program, our new subscription called ClearTalk Weekly, www.subscription.cleartalkmastery.com

 

 

Rerun from April 27, 2016

Speak with Energy with Microphone

Speak with Energy with Microphone

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You must speak as forcefully with a mic as without one.  The energy of your voice gives color and meaning to your language.  The more robust the volume, the greater the intonation, inflection, and greater the shades of meaning you will be able to convey.

 

 

 

Rerun from May 16, 2016